'The Magic of Everyday Life in Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood”', by Mel Campbell

 

Cinema makes magic out of time. It’s only the lag between eyes and brain that makes a succession of still image frames appear to move in a lifelike way. And as an artform, cinema has always toyed with how much or how little to mimic life. At one end of the spectrum, documentaries claim to depict the world as it ‘really is’; at the other, special effects-driven fantasies transcend the everyday.

Richard Linklater’s new drama Boyhood is a magical viewing experience. Like the best stage illusions, it’s masterfully performed and designed to fill its audiences with awe and delight. Because it was filmed gradually, over a period of twelve years, Boyhood authentically represents the passage of time in a way other films can only simulate. We see children grow up before our eyes as their parents age; yet it happens gradually enough to seem completely seamless.

We know exactly how it was done: Linklater and his core cast filmed in four-day stints roughly once a year from 2002 to 2013, writing the story as they went along. But the real magic—the prestige—is that Boyhood’s immersive vision of everyday life doesn’t merely capture a zeitgeist; it also provokes audiences to consider their own personal histories. In this solipsistic way—rather than through such technological trickery as 3D or Smell-O-VisionBoyhood brings cinema tantalisingly close to lived experience.

Read More

'Breaking the Game: The Beauty of a Game World’s Outer Limits', by Shaun Prescott

Illustration by Benjamin Urkowitz.

A skybox is a video game illusion. It is precisely what its name implies: a box of texture which resembles a sky, and maybe within that sky there are some features, but they are not in truth there, and it is impossible to visit them.

There is a melancholy aspect to skyboxes. If the player is knowledgeable enough to recognise a skybox for what it is, they will be less invested in the game world. They will know that it is not possible to visit the skybox, and will therefore need to further suspend their disbelief in order to enjoy the game world. It will too closely resemble a game to them, and not a world. Most regular gamers will immediately know whether they are looking at an impenetrable skybox, or a location they can actually visit. This results in a strange conflict, because the player can behold and admire the skybox, but also know it signifies a limit to the expanse of the game world itself. Skyboxes depict an infinity, but in reality they are barriers. Behind them there is nothing.

For the less aware, skyboxes have the potential to make a world seem vaster and more complex than computer technology could ever handle. For someone who has never given thought to the way video games are made, skyboxes have the potential to be transcendent. They are not merely static textures gating the interactive traversable map from the nothingness that lay behind, but natural extensions to the world. It may not be possible to visit the theoretical plains beneath them, or the illusory skylines that fence them, but if players are unaware they are skyboxes it is possible to imagine they are actual constructions, and not just static images. Maybe there is a secret avenue the player might have taken in order to reach that world. Designers want players to believe that it could be possible to visit them.

Read More

s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s
s

'The Lifted Brow Does Dark Mofo: Intersect: A Photo Essay', by Lucy Parakhina.

'Articulated Intersect' was an installation by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer.

Don’t miss Lucy’s other photo essays from Dark Mofo: catch up on all our Dark Mofo coverage here.

Lucy Parakhina is a photographer and creative producer living in Sydney, Australia.

‘Thanks for Your Feedback on Life!’, by Evan Williams

Public domain image from Wikimedia Commons.

When The Lifted Brow published my piece ‘Life: The Feedback Survey’, I wasn’t actually intending to gather people’s feedback about Life. But by the grace of God—and with a little help from Google Forms—the piece ran as a legit survey and over one hundred readers completed it. Now, I never took STAT100 at uni, but I’m pretty sure ‘over a hundred people’ is a large enough sample size to account for the entire population of planet Earth.

So let’s take a look at how we can improve Life, shall we?

Read More

We need interns!

image

The Lifted Brow is looking for interns! Is it you? Is it in you?

We offer four unpaid internship rounds per year: March—May, June—August, September—November, and December—February. We’re currently accepting applications for the September-November round.

Time required is one day per week, though there are some jobs that can fall outside of that day. Internships are based in Melbourne, at the TLB office in the Docklands.

Interns will do at least one full print issue cycle, gaining good, fun, dirty experience in editing (at all levels), miscellaneous publishing business stuff, design, events management (bands, artists, writers), and being maybe cooked for and patted on the head (a reiteration: this is an unpaid internship).

Interns will gain experience across all areas of publishing and editing: from assessing submissions, to the preparation of articles, to help with handling the business side of making magazines. Whilst you’ll often be encouraged to research interesting projects and contribute creatively, you’ll also have to do a bunch of the usual grunt work: transcription, mail runs, and so on.

Applicants should be available to start at the beginning of September, coming in all day Friday each week. Niceness and good writing and editing skills are the most important things. We’re more than happy to take interns as part of university/TAFE programs, or not.

It’s a big big big boon if you already know lots about TLB. (Can ‘knowing of’ consist of you running out right now and finding a copy of the Brow to ascertain who/what/why the hell we are? Possibly.)

Applications close at 5pm (AEST) on 10 August.

For more details, and to apply, please head to our Submittable page.

Featured Contributor: Christopher Currie

browcontribs:

Christopher Currie is a writer from Brisbane. His first book was called The Ottoman Motel.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘From Rush Hour With Love’ in TLB2.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Search and Define’ in TLB3.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘The Maverick’ in TLB4.

Read Christopher’s column ‘In The Oldest Way’ in TLB5.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Tanzania’ in TLB6.

Read Christopher’s limerick in TLB6.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Realty’ in TLB7.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘1969’ in TLB9.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Lists’ in The Lifted Brow: Digital, Volume 10, Issue 2.

Featured Contributor: Christopher Currie

browcontribs:

Christopher Currie is a writer from Brisbane. His first book was called The Ottoman Motel.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘From Rush Hour With Love’ in TLB2.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Search and Define’ in TLB3.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘The Maverick’ in TLB4.

Read Christopher’s column ‘In The Oldest Way’ in TLB5.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Tanzania’ in TLB6.

Read Christopher’s limerick in TLB6.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Realty’ in TLB7.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘1969’ in TLB9.

Read Christopher’s fiction piece ‘Lists’ in The Lifted Brow: Digital, Volume 10, Issue 2.

Out Now! The Lifted Brow: Digital, Volume Ten, Issue Two

Cover art by Jr.Blue/LashnaTuschewski.

Volume Ten, Issue Two of The Lifted Brow: Digital has entered our worldly, wordy realm! Fire up your apple device to get this latest literary sensation, featuring:

  • #nofilter fiction from Kevin Fanning (USA)
  • Lee Tran Lam navigates an exit survey, poetry-style
  • Michael Fikaris surfs the net in a new comic
  • A compilation of very true and sincere lists by Christopher Currie
  • James Robert Douglas interviews film critic Matt Zoller Seitz

A bit more about our contributors:

  • Lee Tran Lam is a writer who has somehow snuck her byline into the Sydney Morning Herald, Rolling Stone and The Big Issue. She presents a show on FBi radio in Sydney, runs The Unbearable Lightness of Being Hungry food blog and podcast, and has been making zines for the last 17 years (at an incredibly slowcoach pace, though).
  • Michael Fikaris is an artist based in Melbourne, Australia. His work can be seen at www.fikarisart.com.
  • Kevin Fanning writes about celebrities, internet culture, technology, brands and relationships. He is a contributing writer for The Morning News and the Beverage Expert In Residence at Maura Magazine. His story collections include Magical Neon Sexuality and Jennifer Love Hewitt Time Infinity.
  • Christopher Currie is a writer whose novel is called The Ottoman Motel, and whose website is furioushorses.com.
  • James Robert Douglas is a freelance cultural critic and Interviews Editor at The Lifted Brow.
  • Cover art by Lashna Tuschewski, an artist working in illustration, embroidery, collage, hand made jewellery, and ceramics.

The Lifted Brow: Digital is available on your preferred iOS device – get the app now.

Load More